TaylorMade AeroBurner Irons Review – Forgiving and Affordable

by | April 15, 2016

TaylorMade Aeroburner Irons Review

TaylorMade AeroBurner Irons Review (2016)

The following is a comprehensive review of the TaylorMade AeroBurner game-improvement iron set, part of the AeroBurner family of clubs (driver review here). Touting a “new performance package” where “explosive distance meets unsurpassed playability”, the main focuses of this iron are distance and forgiveness.

Just how well do these irons deliver on their claims? Are they worth the buy? What are their strengths/weaknesses? Read on to find out everything you need to know to make an informed purchase.

In a hurry?  Here’s the quick overview and verdict for you…

Rating: 4.6/5 (Highly recommended to try for those with a sub-$500 budget who want value-packed game-improvement sticks)

Pros: Excellent value for the price; very affordable; great look; very good directional and ball speed forgiveness; feel is solid and consistent; longer on average than the RSi 1

Cons: Not quite as forgiving as one might expect for an iron in the max game-improvement class; visible trailing edge in the long irons and thick look of scoring irons at address can be unappealing to some; mishit feedback is not very helpful

Classification: Max Game-Improvement

Recommended for: Golfers with a mid-range budget looking for excellent overall forgiveness and oodles of distance in a large confidence-inspiring profile.

Best places to buy online: Please see the buying table near the bottom of the review.

Want a high-resolution look at the AeroBurner irons? Click on the composite image at the top of the page and navigate the photos on the left-hand side of the screen.


What are the reviews like?

Overall reception for the AeroBurner irons has been very positive, with average customer ratings of 5/5 on Global Golf (those reviews can be seen here), 5/5 on Edwin Watts Golf, 4.7/5 (100% recommended) on the TaylorMade website and 4.9/5 at Rock Bottom Golf, as well as generally positive verdicts from critics.

Users have praised these irons for their ease of use, great mishit forgiveness both in terms of direction and ball speed, very good overall distance, solid feel, consistency and precision with the scoring irons. In terms of negatives, many users would prefer better-feeling mis-hit feedback (and better feel in general), and others feel the irons aren’t as forgiving as they should be.

What are the features?

The clubface of the AeroBurner iron has a coefficient of restitution (COR) that is “up-to-the-limit” or at the maximum that is legally allowed — this means that the clubface transfers as much energy to the ball as possible, maximizing ball speeds and hence distance.

The 4-7 irons feature TaylorMade’s innovative Speed Pocket (also found in the RSi 1) which, through increased face flexion, helps preserve ball speeds and launch angle from strikes low on the face.

The center of gravity (CG) is positioned low and deep to generate higher launch, improved feel and more stability/forgiveness through a greater moment of inertia (MOI). For those who aren’t aware, MOI essentially determines how much the clubface twists in response to off-center strikes; the higher the MOI, the greater the resistance to twisting and the better the mishit forgiveness.

I discuss the appearance of the AeroBurner irons in the “look, sound and feel” section of the review below — be sure to check that out!

The stock shafts available are the steel REAX 88 HL (High Launch) and the graphite AeroBurner REAX 60/50 (men/ladies); both are engineered with a low kick point designed for a higher trajectory (and more distance for those who could use the height). The full specs for the AeroBurner irons are below:

NameLoftLieOffset (mm)Length (men)Length (women)Swing Weight (men) (88 HL/60) Swing Weight (women) (50)
419°61°6.838.88"37.88"D2/D1C5
522°61.75°6.338.25"37.25"D2/D1C5
625.5°62.5°5.837.63"36.63"D2/D1C5
729.5°63°5.337"36"D2/D1C5
833.5°63.5°4.636.5"35.5"D2/D1C5
938°64°4.136"35"D2/D1C5
PW43°64.5°3.535.5"34.5"D2/D1C5
AW49°64.5°335.25"34.25"D2/D1C5
SW55°64.5°2.535"34"D3/D2C6

How do these irons perform?

Distance/Distance Control: The AeroBurner turns out to be one of the longer game-improvement irons on the market. Relatively speaking, and based on testing, yardages are on average slightly greater than those of the RSi 1 but tend to have a greater variance. This is a negative in my view — when it comes to irons, I’d take consistent yardages over greater average distance in most cases on the golf course, but that’s just me — then again, the RSi 1 is definitively more expensive. Mild to moderate off-center strikes seem to only give up a few yards in lost distance.

Forgiveness: Directional and ball speed forgiveness are both very good, which is not all that surprising considering the AeroBurner iron is marketed as max game-improvement with a high MOI. More specifically, the long face reduces the likelihood of you hitting too far towards the toe and heel where ball flight is compromised the most. The Speed Pocket does a superb job of salvaging the common thin shot, and the high-MOI design makes for stable impact across the face.

Trajectory: Despite the relatively strong lofts, most people will be quite pleased to experience a mid-high ball flight — this is mostly due to the location of the CG as well as the high-launch attribute of the stock shaft. Although this tends to be the norm, I would like to stress that your exact trajectory/ball flight will depend on your swing, shaft and specific iron configuration, so it would be dishonest of me to guarantee performance or results in any way. It should be noted that, according to TaylorMade, the CG produces a slight left bias (or right bias for lefties) of about 2.5 yards; this can help golfers who routinely push their iron shots.

Playability/Workability: The wide sole of the AeroBurner has little problem cutting through the turf and taking some of the sting out of any fat shots you might hit. It does just fine out of the rough, bunker and any other trouble lie you can think of. As expected, workability is limited, but able golfers can shape shots to an extent.

What about look, sound and feel?

Look: Overall the look runs in line with what you would expect from a max game-improvement iron. The AeroBurner iron has a dark matte finish that reduces glare and makes for a sleek appearanceOffset is substantial (much more than the RSi 1 all throughout the set) but not enough to be distracting or impractical. The top line is thick, the sole is wide and the blade length is long, all serving to inspire confidence at address and enable easier striking. The badge features an appealing black/gray/red/white colour palette with fairly simplistic labeling.

One thing I disliked was the fat/thick appearance of the scoring irons which might turn some people off. In addition, the trailing edge of the longer irons (5 and below) is visible at address and this can be distracting to some.

Feel: Feel is pretty consistent throughout the set, which is nice. Pure strikes feel very solid and satisfying, minor mis-hits feel almost as good and severe mis-hits don’t feel overly jarring. The irons themselves feel comfortable (to me at least) and stable throughout the swing. I wouldn’t say mis-hit feedback is the greatest, but it does seem to be distinct enough for troubleshooting purposes.

Where should I buy these irons online?

Best Online LocationsPrices (subject to change)Shipping DetailsReturns/ExchangesAdditional Notes
AmazonClick here to display current prices.- free shipping available
- eligible free two-day shipping and free same-day shipping for Amazon Prime members (free trial available)
- fast and reliable
- exchanges can be made through the Online Returns Center if the option is available
- returns can generally be made within 30 days of receipt of shipment (past 30 days up to 80% of the price can be refunded)
- steel and graphite shaft options available
- AeroBurner iron combo sets, which substitute longer irons with graphite hybrids, are also available
- A-to-z Guarantee ensures you receive your item from third-party sellers as advertised and in a timely manner
- trusted with excellent customer service
eBayClick here to display current listings.- shipping speeds and costs depend on location, individual seller and available services (free options sometimes available)- in the event returns are allowed, they can be initiated easily through the eBay website
- exact policies depend on the individual seller
- great for used and new Aeroburner irons
- some awesome deals for used AeroBurner irons
- generally offers the best prices for used clubs
- overstock is often sold here at a substantial discount
Global GolfClick here to display the current price.- multitude of options available including Economy (often free) and Next Day
- international shipping available
- shipping discount codes can be used at checkout
- exchanges can be initiated by contacting Global Golf directly
- unused equipment can be returned for a full refund within 30 days, subject to certain conditions, through the online returns center
- many items qualify for a 30-Day Playability Guarantee, which allows customers to return used clubs within 30 days for a full refund in the form of store credit
- offers coupon/discount/promotional codes on an ongoing basis to be used at checkout

Conclusion

The AeroBurner irons are a worthy and now very affordable addition to TaylorMade’s family of game-improvement irons. There’s plenty of them for mid to high handicappers including great distance, superb forgiveness, solid feel and a confidence-inspiring look. I strongly suggest that any golfer with a mid-range budget who wants a bang-for-the-buck set of game-improvement irons give these a try.

If you have any thoughts or questions about the TaylorMade AeroBurner irons, be sure to leave a comment below!


Images courtesy of:  Amazon

6 thoughts on “TaylorMade AeroBurner Irons Review – Forgiving and Affordable

  1. Nathan

    Hey

    These sound exactly like the kind of irons I’m after – affordable and forgiving.

    I’ve neglected golf recently (partly because of poor clubs – I know blaming the tools!). I think game improvement clubs are what I need.

    The Aeroburner irons look a good choice especially considering that I don’t want to invest too much.

    One question I’ve been thinking about. With game improvement irons what is the disadvantage over players irons? Is it that you don’t get the same feel so don’t get as good a feedback of how you are hitting the ball? Could you just continue to use game improvement clubs or is it best to move to players clubs at some point?

    Reply
    1. Paul Post author

      I had a more lengthy response typed out but I lost it after the power flicked off and on, so here’s the concise version: with players irons it’s usually quite easy to distinguish between center and off-center strikes, while with game-improvement irons it’s generally more difficult (but not impossible by any means). So in that sense, feedback is generally better with players irons. Players irons often feel better in the hands and throughout the swing as well, but this isn’t always the case or even mostly the case. Other things to consider when it comes to game-improvement irons are reduced workability/control (a natural consequence of increased forgiveness) and a bulkier head profile — whether or not these can be considered disadvantages depend on the individual.

      As for your last question, if you feel that you can hit the ball consistently solid and want to take your game to the next level, transitioning over to players irons would probably be a good idea. This isn’t set in stone, however, and you can have a ton of success with game-improvement irons no matter your skill level. It’s really up to you. One of TaylorMade’s newest better-player models is the PSi — you can check out the full review of it on Golfstead here. I hope this helps!

      Reply
  2. Diana

    I wish I’d found this review last week! My cousin’s birthday was on Friday and he’s been looking for a new iron.

    That being said, it seems like the Aeroburner is great for any golfer to improve the distance of their swing at an affordable price. I like its trajectory and ball speed; the fact that it picks up is awesome. For a rookie like my cousin and myself, it is an advantage that the Aeroburner helps keep my swing on its path.

    Maybe I’ll get him one for Christmas. Lol

    Diana

    Reply
    1. Paul Post author

      It would still be a great belated birthday gift if he didn’t already get new irons; Christmas is a ways away! That aside, I appreciate the comment. Let me know if you have any questions.

      Reply
  3. Fairweather Green

    I’ve always used Taylor Made Irons and woods, something about the design that I prefer over the other leading golf brands.

    The problem I have found with these oversized heads is that the weight in the head usually feels too light.

    How does the head weight of these compare to a TP edition of the Taylor Made iron range?

    Reply
    1. Paul Post author

      Thanks for the comment. Perhaps the manufacturer is trying to compensate for the larger head size and overdoes it a little bit. When I tested the AeroBurner irons, the head weight didn’t particularly stand out to me. Which TP irons are you talking about specifically? That line goes back to at least 2009 and comes in three different variants (CB, MC and MB).

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *