Callaway Big Bertha Fusion Heavy Driver Review – More Control

Callaway Big Bertha Fusion Heavy Driver - 3 Perspectives

In this review, I’ll be taking a look at the Callaway Big Bertha Fusion Heavy driver.

If you’ve been looking at the Big Bertha Fusion driver, you may have heard about the heavy variant. It’s largely the same as the original, but the stock length is slightly shorter, and the weighting in the head is slightly different.

The Big Bertha Fusion Heavy driver is ideal for those seeking more control and accuracy off the tee.

So, how does the Big Bertha Fusion Heavy perform in comparison to the Big Bertha Fusion? Is it worth putting in the bag? Who should use this driver?

Read on to find out what you need to know to make an informed purchase.


What are the reviews like?

Not surprisingly, the Big Bertha Fusion Heavy driver has a very positive reception similar to that of the Big Bertha Fusion.

It currently has a 4.8/5 (95% recommended) score on Callaway Golf Pre-Owned.

What People Like

  • many players have reported better feel and workability over the Big Bertha Fusion
  • straight and long
  • consistent results
  • has all of the benefits of the Big Bertha Fusion

What People Don’t Like

  • the shorter length doesn’t suit everyone
  • some feel that impact sounds a bit strange

What are the features?

The Big Bertha Fusion Heavy driver has the same features and technologies as the Big Bertha Fusion, which I talk about in my review of that driver. There are two key differences.

Shorter Length

One difference is that the stock length of the driver is 1 inch shorter, at 44.5 inches.

This offers more control and precision for players who prefer shorter driver lengths.

Heavier Head

The other is that a heavier 12g weight is placed in the back of the head, hence the “heavy” label.

This ensures correct weighting of the driver at the shorter shaft length, and it also helps to increase the spin a little bit for more control.

Stock Info

The Big Bertha Fusion Heavy driver has the same lofts and CC as the Big Bertha Fusion, at , 10.5°, 13.5°, and 460CC, respectively.

The driver comes with an Optifit hosel that allows you to adjust loft and lie up to 1° down and 2° up. The lie settings are N (neutral) and D (draw), giving a total of 8 possible configurations.


How does the driver perform?

In this review, I’ll be comparing the Big Bertha Fusion Heavy driver to the results I got when testing the Big Bertha Fusion.

Distance

I actually found that I was getting a bit less distance (about 5 yards or so) with the Fusion Heavy.

You may be surprised to hear this, but I imagine it’s because of the altered weighting in the head that produces a bit more spin (a heavier weight in the back). It results in a little higher of a trajectory as well.

I would say that the difference in negligible. Your distance results will to depend on a lot of factors including your shaft, swing, and OptiFit settings.

Forgiveness

I found forgiveness to be slightly better than the Big Bertha Fusion, whose forgiveness is already really good.

This is pretty much what I expected considering the shorter length and more rearward CG. My poorer mis-hits lost about 5 yards of distance on average.

This is why, if you want more forgiveness in your driver, you should probably choose the Heavy variant.

Ball Flight

Typical ball flights with the Big Bertha Fusion Heavy are straight or slight draws, as they are with the Big Bertha Fusion.

But as I mentioned above, the trajectory tends to be a bit higher, all else equal. This can be a solid positive for some players.

Once you see that you’re hitting it straight, it becomes a matter of optimizing your launch angle using the OptiFit hosel.


What about look, sound & feel?

The Look

The Big Bertha Fusion Heavy driver has the same look as the Big Bertha Fusion. The only difference is the slightly shorter length and the heavier weight in the clubhead.

The head has an unusual triangular shape designed to optimize aerodynamics and clubhead speed. Some certainly won’t like it, but I think it inspires confidence at address.

The Sound & Feel

Given the key distinguishing features of the Big Bertha Fusion Heavy, you might expect the sound and feel to be a little different from the Big Bertha Fusion.

Well, that’s true to an extent. It sounds and feels muted at impact like the Big Bertha Fusion, but a touch more solid and impactful. I also found during my testing that mis-hits feel a bit better relative to sweet spot strikes.


Where should you buy this driver online?

The Big Bertha Fusion Heavy driver is now a few years old, and you can no longer order it custom-made directly from the official Callaway website.

The best you can do now is look for models on Callaway Golf Pre-Owned and eBay.

CGPO has the most obvious availability, with a 12-month warranty, 90-day buy-back policy, and included headcover.


Conclusion

The Callaway Big Bertha Fusion Heavy driver delivers more or less the same quality performance as the Big Bertha Fusion.

It’s a rock solid option for players who prefer a shorter length and more control and workability in their driver.

Keep in mind that many players will hit the ball better with a shorter length driver. In many cases, it can make a huge difference in your performance on the course.

If you want more accuracy off the tee and aren’t obsessed with distance, you should definitely give the Big Bertha Fusion Heavy a try.


Are you interested in the Big Bertha Fusion Heavy driver? Have you tried it yet? What have your results been? Let us know in the comments below.

Callaway Big Bertha Fusion Heavy Driver

9.1

Distance

9.6/10

Forgiveness

9.6/10

Ball Flight

9.4/10

Look

8.5/10

Sound & Feel

8.2/10

Pros

  • Slightly different sound & feel will appeal to many
  • More control and workability over the Big Bertha Fusion
  • Long and straight
  • Reliable results
  • It packs all the benefits of the Big Bertha Fusion

Cons

  • Some don't like the feel at impact
  • The shorter length isn't for everyone

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